×

Please use Chrome or Firefox for better user experience!
Write a New Story!
Popular Tags
What Others Are Reading

Feedback
memories

Hopemai
3Mins Each
1
ENTRY
Unforgettable Memories
✪ Ending IN 25 DAYS
G
1
13
2
Creator's
Pick

The worst part of holding the memories is not the pain. It’s the loneliness of it. Memories need to be shared.

Share your happiest and most cherishible memory if not that share a memory that you can't forget?

Question
Creator's Pick
Read More
Take the Challenge!
Unforgettable Memories

The worst part of holding the memories is not the pain. It’s the loneliness of it. Memories need to be shared.

Share your happiest and most cherishible memory if not that share a memory that you can't forget?

Read More
Take the Challenge!
Coen WonderLovelyShereeLife lessNicole Armas
+5
2Mins Each
8
ENTRIES
Penana Christmas Contest!
✪ Submission Closed
PG-13
11
4251
7
Creator's
Pick

Christmas is just around the corner and I would like to host a Christmas theme contest:)

Prompt:

Write about a memorable Christmas gift you once received from someone. You can also write it in the form of a story.

Word Limit:

Under 1000 words

Have fun writing and wish you all a very Merry Christmas!

Flash
Creator's Pick
Read More
Penana Christmas Contest!

Christmas is just around the corner and I would like to host a Christmas theme contest:)

Prompt:

Write about a memorable Christmas gift you once received from someone. You can also write it in the form of a story.

Word Limit:

Under 1000 words

Have fun writing and wish you all a very Merry Christmas!

Read More
SargambelwanshiMaria Minx
1Min Each
0
ENTRIES
A Hero's Souvenir Home
✪ Ending IN 36 DAYS
G
1
89
0
Creator's
Pick

A Soldier on the front dies in the middle of writing a letter home. It is finished and sent by the man who killed him.

No word limit.

No imagination limit.

No emotions limit.

No Epoch Boundations.

Example-:

"There are many times while I am out in the field that I really feel the need to talk to you," 27-year-old 1st Lt. Dean Allen wrote to his wife, Joyce, from Vietnam on July 10, 1967. “Not so much about us but what I have on my mind.” At 6-foot-1, 200 pounds, Allen cut an imposing figure, but under his tough exterior was a compassionate, thoughtful officer who genuinely cared for his men. “Being a good platoon leader is a lonely job,” he wrote.

Allen continued the letter the next day:

It got so dark I had to stop last night. …Writing like that doesn’t really do that much good because you aren’t here to answer me or discuss something. I guess it helps a little though because you are the only one I would say these things to. Maybe sometime I’ll even try to tell you how scared I have been or am now. … Sometimes I really wonder how I’ll make it. My luck is running way to good right now. I just hope it lasts.

Don’t worry about what I have said, these are just things I think about sometimes. I am so healthy I can’t get a day out of the field and you know I’m to damn mean to die. …

Sorry I haven’t written more but the weather is against me. You can’t write out here when it rains hour after hour.I love you with all my heart.

All my love always, Dean

Four days later, Allen stepped on a land mine. He became one of the more than 58,000 Americans who died in Vietnam.

One of the letters I read recently. This letter ended in a different scenario with different theme.

But I've provided you the building blocks of the story already (above), which has a unique twist in between, follow your heart, pen down how it feels to live as the selfless protector of the country.

This is your BattleField!

Flash
Creator's Pick
Read More
Take the Challenge!
A Hero's Souvenir Home

A Soldier on the front dies in the middle of writing a letter home. It is finished and sent by the man who killed him.

No word limit.

No imagination limit.

No emotions limit.

No Epoch Boundations.

Example-:

"There are many times while I am out in the field that I really feel the need to talk to you," 27-year-old 1st Lt. Dean Allen wrote to his wife, Joyce, from Vietnam on July 10, 1967. “Not so much about us but what I have on my mind.” At 6-foot-1, 200 pounds, Allen cut an imposing figure, but under his tough exterior was a compassionate, thoughtful officer who genuinely cared for his men. “Being a good platoon leader is a lonely job,” he wrote.

Allen continued the letter the next day:

It got so dark I had to stop last night. …Writing like that doesn’t really do that much good because you aren’t here to answer me or discuss something. I guess it helps a little though because you are the only one I would say these things to. Maybe sometime I’ll even try to tell you how scared I have been or am now. … Sometimes I really wonder how I’ll make it. My luck is running way to good right now. I just hope it lasts.

Don’t worry about what I have said, these are just things I think about sometimes. I am so healthy I can’t get a day out of the field and you know I’m to damn mean to die. …

Sorry I haven’t written more but the weather is against me. You can’t write out here when it rains hour after hour.I love you with all my heart.

All my love always, Dean

Four days later, Allen stepped on a land mine. He became one of the more than 58,000 Americans who died in Vietnam.

One of the letters I read recently. This letter ended in a different scenario with different theme.

But I've provided you the building blocks of the story already (above), which has a unique twist in between, follow your heart, pen down how it feels to live as the selfless protector of the country.

This is your BattleField!

Read More
Take the Challenge!