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Young Adult Fiction Society
Young Adult Fiction Society
INFO
NEWS FEED
DISCUSSION
MEMBERS (67)
Discussion Thread
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
An all-inclusive place to discuss anything and everything YA! Talk about plot lines, characters, meanings, and anything else you'd like about any piece of YA fiction, published or not!
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
This is just my two cents on YA but I find the vast majority of books directed towards teenagers are awful and too cliched (Twilight and the Hush, Hush are such abominations). It's as if the authors don't think young people have the intelligence to understand or appreciate good literature so they publish garbage on the insulting assumption that teenagers will read it. However, there are good YA books and series like the Hunger Games or Divergent but the vast majority are awful.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
I could not agree with you more! I almost feel a little cheated by the YA garbage that's out there today because readers have associated the bad writing with a good genre, and they're hesitant to give it a chance. I think good YA fiction resonates well with adults, not just kids, and that's how you can tell what's quality.
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, Exactly. The Outsiders and the Catcher in the Rye for example are typically books directed towards a younger audience (both books are used in Canadian schools for English) but they're books from the YA genre that all ages can really enjoy and appreciate. It's definitely not the genre itself that's the problem, it's the standards the writers are held to.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Nicole Armas, I'd really like to see that standard change, and I think that's why I'm so drawn to the genre. I mean, I don't consider myself some kind of fantastic writer or anything, but I'd like to contribute. Besides, writing for young adults is awesome; they're in their formative years, and they are so empowered by words on the page. I know I was!
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, For sure! I find a lot of the novels I have read so far in my time in high school has really influenced my writing and given me inspiration.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Nicole Armas, which is great, because there really are some great YA authors out there. I'm pretty sure my work is most influenced by J.D. Salinger, John Knowles, and a little John Green. Maybe some Kurt Vonnegut
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, There certainly are. Oddly enough, the authors I always liked were the writers from the Victorian era and even Shakespeare. Mind you, I don't think my writing reflects their style of writing at all (although I have tried) but I always liked how flowery their language was.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Nicole Armas, I think that was the age of incredible language. Those writers had such command of prose it's nothing short of jaw-dropping! Shakespeare, Spencer, Both Dickens, Thoreau, Wodehouse, all of them!
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, They certainly did!
Flow
Flow2 years ago
Ever heard of "Five Flavors of Dumb?" It's one of those rare "OMG these characters are realistic and so are there interactions! How strange!"

The only other one like that I can think off the top of my head right now is an ebook called "Not For Me." If you're going to read Not For Me, I suggest binge reading it. At first it's not so good, but hot damn when you get 2/3 of the way in you're like "Holy whack, now that was a plot twist! Wow the main character is actually developing. Oh God Andrew why?"

Though the thing I like most about it is probably how it gave me feels even though if it was written just a little differently I would've said "This is ansty trash." The author did a good job.
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@JellyKat,  I haven't heard of either of those books but I'll be sure to check them out. But wow is "Not For Me" really that bad???
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Nicole Armas,
Noooooo! It's really good! It just gets a whole lot better in the last third of the book. I was praising thy ebook, it has some of the best and also realistic plot twists. Warning you will hate Lexia for awhile, better she gets better trust me : D

So good that it made me cry.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@JellyKat, "so good that it made me cry" is always an excellent review. Evoking emotion in a reader is a must for great writing!
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
@JellyKat, Oh okay XD
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Andrew Knight
I was frustrated the first half the book though. Lexia seemed like she could be the next suicide victim. But she went through character development and got friends like Andrew.... God dammit Andrew why!
Frances
Frances2 years ago
I just read the 'Maze Runner' series and thought it was a blast. But honestly, wasn't a fan of 'Divergent'
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
Man, I need to get out and read... I used to read all the time (}almost literally) but now I'm terrified of being unintentionally influenced by other authors work while I'm producing my own stuff...

What about Divergent didn't you like? I've heard all good things.
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
Maze Runner was amazing! I couldn't put those books down! I found Divergent to be very similar to the Hunger Games but I thought it still an enjoyable enough read.
Frances
Frances2 years ago
I thought she just did a spin off of Hunger Games, also it felt kind of like a dystopian version of Twilight, like the author just wanted to write a really sexy hero for the main character (that is based on herself) to fall in love with. I mean, I guess she had that overriding theme of 'accept yourself and be yourself' but it kind of got lost in the melodramatic teenage hormones.

No offense if anyone liked them!!! It's nothing personal. It was an entertaining read but I am surprised it got made into a movie. Nothing I'd write home about
Nicole Armas
Nicole Armas2 years ago
I totally get where you're coming from. I admit I didn't really buy into the romance of the novels, it didn't seem genuine.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
Kind of reminds me of The Host. I mean, I loved the concept, but the freaking four-way love rhombus, or whatever?! Couldn't get past that.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
I can say that as a writer I've fallen victim to creating a fantasy lovechild in some of my characters... when I pulled away from that, though, I immediately saw the writing get better
Frances
Frances2 years ago
Honestly, I love writing romance. I think it's why I am such a harsh critic of it when I read it. Too many perfect characters falling in love out there in YA fic. It screws kids up, I swear.
Flow
Flow2 years ago
I lack the ability to write romance, though I would to like to know.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@JellyKat, I think they key to romance is realism. It's hard to write love if you haven't felt heartbreak! Frances and I have the benefit of having me our soul mates already (I'd like to believe) so I think that is a huge factor.
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Andrew Knight,
I have no interest in a relationship. I'm anEsexual.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@JellyKat, which is maybe why you have trouble with romance (which makes sense). I'm sure there's a way to study it to get better at writing it, but authenticity is important
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Andrew Knight,
I get what you're saying. Seems I shall never write good romance, unless Jake English or Kankri become real. Never mind a relationship with Kankri will last approximately 413 seconds.
Bobby
Bobby2 years ago
I never used to write YA and I haven't read YA really since I was a young adult myself... But I think I've been writing a lot of it lately. I think? Tbh I'm a little hazy on exactly what the definition of the genre is. Cliches aside, at its core is YA just fiction primarily marketed to young adults? Or am I missing something you think?
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
You're right. Though I like to include "works that are about young adults" as well to sort of broaden the genre a little. Adolescence is an important subject, whether it be the subject of the work or the targeted audience of the work
Alef Magnus
Alef Magnus2 years ago
@Andrew Knight,  which brings up a good question. Are YA only focused on teens aged 14-19 dealing with friendships, early relationships and school or does it also include 20-24 college peeps and straight out of college demographic still lost at adulthood?
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Alef Magnus,
I think it could. I think I read one like that. Sure it was complete trash, but it did have collage age characters. Except the male lead since he's immortal or whatever. Can't believe my friend suggested it to me.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Alef Magnus, actually, there's a sub-genre named "new adult" that focuses on college age individuals. I just learned that while going through the submissions processes for publishing.
Flow
Flow2 years ago
@Andrew Knight,
Huh, didn't know that was a thing.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@JellyKat, me neither until a few weeks ago. Must be a new thing
Alef Magnus
Alef Magnus2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, Oh wow. I did just type it on search and yep it is legit. Deemed as the older YA, and only recently coined in 2009. This actually helps. My problems with YA in the past has always been about not relating to it anymore because I was in that age where I was so focused on working/getting corporate. So having that genre really helps if readers are looking for something to relate to on their current state.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Alef Magnus, and you really don't see too many stories that center around 20-24 year olds, huh? Usually it goes from about 14-18 and then 25+
Alef Magnus
Alef Magnus2 years ago
@Andrew Knight, Yeah I haven't really read any story about someone just getting out of college and trying to get work. It's like a big hole in everyone's lives that no one wants to talk about. Cause it's either sad, traumatizing, or boring.
Andrew Knight
Andrew Knight2 years ago
@Alef Magnus, nail, meet hammer! Yeah, "new adulthood" can be a real bummer haha
Bobby
Bobby2 years ago
That actually makes a lot of sense. I haven't actually written any meaningful YA yet, but when I do I want it to be meaningful to adolescents and adults alike
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